Occular Anatomy

Video: Histology of the Eye

Posted by on May 4, 2010 in Occular Anatomy | 0 comments

An outstanding overview of the major structures of the eye from the University of Missouri Medical School including: the Cornea, Lens, Ciliary Body, Iris, Ciliary Epithelium, Canal of Schlemm, Neuron Chain, Rods and Cones, Neural retina, and Fovea...

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Extraocular Muscles

Posted by on May 4, 2010 in Occular Anatomy | 0 comments

Extraocular Muscles The stabilization of eye movement is accomplished by six extraocular muscles attached to the eye via the sclera. The six muscles and their function are: Lateral rectus – moves the eye outward, away from the nose Medial rectus – moves the eye inward, toward the nose Superior rectus – moves the eye upward and slightly outward Inferior rectus – moves the eye downward and slightly inward Superior oblique – moves the eye outward and downward Inferior oblique – moves the eye outward and upward In addition to movement and tracking,...

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Refractive Errors

Posted by on May 4, 2010 in Occular Anatomy | 1 comment

Refractive errors occur when abnormalities of the eye prevent the proper focus of light on the retina. Emmetropia refers to an eye free of refractive errors. Common Refractive Errors Two common types of refractive errors are myopia and hyperopia. Myopia Myopia, also known as near-sightedness, occurs if the eye is longer than normal or the curve of the cornea is too steep, causing light rays focus in front of the retina. Patients with myopia are able to see objects at near, but distant objects appear blurred. Clear vision can be restored to most myopes through the use of minus-powered...

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Common Eye Disorders

Posted by on May 4, 2010 in Occular Anatomy | 0 comments

Amblyopia – a reduction or dimming of vision in an eye that appears to be normal. Also commonly known as lazy eye, amblyopia is an eye condition noted by reduced vision not correctable by glasses or contact lenses and is not due to any eye disease. The brain does not fully acknowledge the images received by the amblyopic eye. This almost always affects only one eye but may manifest with reduction of vision in both eyes. Aphakia – Absence of the lens, due to surgical removal, perforating wound or ulcer, or congenital anomaly; causes a loss of accommodation, hyperopia, and a deep...

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Video: Diseases of the Aging Eye

Posted by on May 4, 2010 in Occular Anatomy | 0 comments

An Eye Digest presentation which includes a brief discussion of Glaucoma, Macular Degeneration, Diabetic Retinopathy, Cataract, and Presbyopia. The presentation also includes a discussion of implications for aging Americans. Anatomy (start 02:55), Glaucoma (start 04:44), Macular Degeneration (start 08:08), Diabetic Retinopathy (start 12:18), Cataract (start 17:44), Presbyopia (start 20:24) and Eye Disease Prevalence Study (start...

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Major Ocular Structures

Posted by on May 4, 2010 in Occular Anatomy | 0 comments

Major Ocular Structures The eye is made up of three layers: the outer layer called the fibrous tunic, which consists of the sclera and the cornea; the middle layer responsible for nourishment, called the vascular tunic, which consists of the iris, the choroid, and the ciliary body; and the inner layer of photoreceptors and neurons called the nervous tunic, which consists of the retina. The eye also contains three fluid-filled chambers. The volume between the cornea and the iris is known as the anterior chamber, while the volume between the iris and the lens is know as the posterior...

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